Tag Archives: Study

Study: Women’s Athletics Lack Diversity

By Free Radical

Dawn Staley coached the University of South Carolina Gamecocks to a national championship in 2017.

Dawn Staley coached the University of South Carolina Gamecocks to a national championship in 2017.

Though African-American athletes dominate several collegiate sports, their numbers among coaches is disproportionately small, according to a new report.

This is definitely the case in women’s sports. It was revealed that nearly 88% of coaches of women’s college teams are White and 57% of them are men. Only 7% of women’s college sports coaches are Black, 2.8% are Latino, 2.2% are Asian, and less than 1% are Hawaiian or Pacific Islander.

Conferences such as the Ivy League, Big Ten, Big East, and the SEC were given Fs for diversity. The SEC is home to the current women’s basketball champions, the University of South Carolina Gamecocks, coached by Dawn Staley, a Black woman.

Clemson University, located in South Carolina, had the highest percentage of coaches of color for women’s

Study: Cancer Survival Depends on Type of Insurance

By Free Radical

 Studies show that cancer patients who have private insurance survive at higher rates than patients with Medicaid or no insurance.


Studies show that cancer patients who have private insurance survive at higher rates than patients with Medicaid or no insurance.

Two newly released studies indicate that cancer patients’ survival rate is closely linked to the type of insurance they can afford. The reports published in the journal Cancer showed that patients who had private medical insurance experienced cancer in which the disease spread slower and less aggressively than individuals who had Medicaid or no insurance at all.

One study tracked testicular cancer in more than 10,200 adult men from 2007 to 2011. Medicaid patients were 62% more likely to see the disease metastasize (spread throughout the body) than patients with private insurance. Ironically, this rate was higher than uninsured patients who were 26% more likely to have their cancer metastasize than men with private insurance.

Yet, uninsured patients had poorer survival rates. They were 88% more likely to die from testicular cancer than individuals with private insurance while men with Medicaid were 51% more likely to