Category Archives: Entertainment

LaVar Ball Pulls Son LiAngelo Out of UCLA

By MCNS Staff

LiAngelo Ball

LiAngelo Ball

LaVar Ball told espn.com that he has pulled his son, LiAngelo, from UCLA and its basketball program before he played even one game.

“We are exploring other options with Gelo,” LaVar Ball said. “He’s out of there.”

The news was first reported by TMZ.com.

A freshman and the middle son of LaVar, LiAngelo Ball was one of three student athletes who were arrested and detained in China for a shoplifting incident that sparked international attention. They were suspended indefinitely by the school following the incident.

“I’m not sitting back and waiting,” LaVar Ball told ESPN. “He wasn’t punished this bad in China.”

The elder Ball had previously stated that LiAngelo would only stay at UCLA for one season, even if he wasn’t a projected draft pick. His older brother Lonzo played one season there before being drafted No. 2 by the LA Lakers.

“He’s not transferring to another school,” he told ESPN. “The plan is now to get Gelo ready for the NBA draft.”

“I’m going to make him way better for the draft than UCLA ever could have,” LaVar Ball said.

According to national reports, the three players are subject to review for violating the university’s Student Conduct Code, which includes a section on theft.

The players’ indefinite suspensions include not being allowed to suit up, practice or take team trips with the Bruins.

“We get back over here and the consequences were even stiffer than China. So basically they’re in jail here,” LaVar Ball has said of the suspension.

Reviews: The “It” in “She’s Gotta Have It”

By S. Christopher Emerson

DeWanda Wise as Nola Darling of the Netflix series, "She's Gotta Have It."

DeWanda Wise as Nola Darling of the Netflix series, “She’s Gotta Have It.”

That’s right… I haven’t finished watching the series yet, but yebo, I’m gonna comment on it anyway… This needs to be said.

Millions of melanated youth came of age and consciousness in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s as hip hop got bigger and Blacker (which unfortunately made it prey to white economic greed) when Spike Lee’s directorial star rose with the original She’s Gotta Have It. Among them was me, who identified with Lee’s intelligent slick block boy and Nola Darling romantic interest Mars Blackmon, who added even more punch to an already quirky independent project. Remembering sneaking to see the movie on Skinemax (‘cuz I wasn’t wild enough to try to sneak into a theatre just yet) and laughing at AAAAALLLLLL the sex scenes and innuendo that I could catch still gives me pleasant thoughts of my innocence being forced to mature in the face of such a jazzy hip hop black-and-white Brooklyn romp as SGHI. And after Tracy Camilla Johns captivated and aggravated all of our loving hearts and enticed us to explore our own sexualities (plural intended), Spike continued on his roll of cinematic success with Black Gen Xer favorite School Daze in 1988 and Do the Right Thing, which was snubbed for a Best Picture Oscar in 1989, but nominated for a Best Original Screenplay Academy Award that year.

Spike’s scope addressed some incredibly relevant issues of our post-Civil Rights, post-Black Power au currant Back-to-Afrika times in our communities. This includes

British Mag Sorry for Altering Nyong’o Image

_98699698_graziapicBy MCNS Staff

According to international reports, British magazine Grazia U.K. has apologized to actress Lupita Nyong’o after she accused it of altering her hair on its front cover “to fit a more Eurocentric notion” of beauty.

Blackamericaweb.com reports the Academy Award winner tweeted before-and-after images, saying the magazine “edited out and smoothed” her hair. She added the hashtag “dtmh (don’t touch my hair).”

On Instagram, the Kenya-raised star of “12 Years a Slave” and “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” said “there is still a very long way to go to combat the unconscious prejudice against black women’s complexion, hairstyle and texture.”

Friday, the magazine said that it “apologized unreservedly to Lupita Nyong’o.” It said it had not altered the images itself or asked the photographer to do so, and “is committed to representing diversity throughout its pages.”

Houston Players Kneel in Protest to Owners Comment

Houston Texans players kneel before Seahawks game.

Houston Texans players kneel before Seahawks game.

By MCNS Staff

As the NFL protests and boycott gain momentum, more controversial incidents fuel player demonstrations.

In the wake of racist comments made by Houston Texans owner Bob McNair, nearly all of the team players knelt during the national anthem before their game against the Seattle Seahawks on Sunday. The players were widely expected to engage in some form of demonstration going into the game.

CBS did not broadcast the anthem at 4 pm Eastern Time, instead showing a golf event. Pictures and video surfacing on news and social media show around 40 of the 50+ member team kneeling in lines with arms linked, with only a few players standing behind them.

McNair caused a furor among players and across the country when it was revealed in an ESPN story that he said, “We can’t have the inmates running the prison” when referring to players.

McNair apologized to the team for the comment, but suggested that instead of describing players, he was analogizing the relationship of team owners to the league and Commissioner Roger Goodell. Many players weren’t convinced of McNair’s remorse, since there are no organized NFL owner protests happening, and discussed a response. Reports indicate that DeAndre Hopkins and D’Onta Foreman walked out of the team’s practice on Friday after hearing about the remarks.

“I think it was ignorant,” Texans’ offensive lineman Duane Brown told reporters. “I think it was embarrassing. I think it angered a lot of players, including myself. We put our bodies and minds on the line every time we step on that field, and to use an analogy of inmates in prison, that’s disrespectful. That’s how I feel about it.”

Across the field, several members of the Seattle Seahawks sat on the bench during the anthem, including Michael Bennett, Sheldon Richardson and Cliff Avril. Linebacker Michael Wilhoite again took a knee.